Summary of Criteria for Determining Significance and Materiality

Summary of Criteria for Determining Significance and Materiality

The criteria listed below are the factors that the Council considers when determining whether a change to the LTP is significant or material, or significant enough to trigger a formal audited amendment to the LTP.

Assessing Significance

Please refer to the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, November 2014 for further information. www.dunedin.govt.nz/significance-and-engagement-policy

Factors that are considered in assessing significance:

  • Is the project/programme already in the LTP?
  • Is there a budget change? (Is this an increase or decrease?)
  • What is the value of the change in the 2016 year?
  • Does the budget change result in a change to service levels? (Is this an increase or decrease?)
  • Importance to Dunedin
  • Importance to the community
  • Consistency with strategy, policy and previous decisions
  • Impact on capacity and capability of the Council to meet legislative requirements
  • Impact on capacity and capability of the Council to delivery existing work programme
  • What are the opportunity costs of the project?
  • How hard it would be to reverse the decision once it was made?

Assessing whether changes are Material

Note: Materiality in this context is not the same as the concept that is commonly used in financial reporting and can’t always be reduced to a dollar value.

Factors to be considered:

  1. Would this project/proposal cause a reasonable person to change their view of the affordability of the plan or of the service levels being provided?
  2. Would this project/proposal cause a reasonable person to want to/not want to provide feedback on the proposal?

It should be noted that a decision may not be material in its own right but when considered cumulatively with other decisions it may become material.